• History

    The first settler to arrive in the Milford area was the Rev. Francis McCormick, a Revolutionary War soldier with a thousand acre land grant, in 1796. He built his log cabin on the hill at the present 1000 Forest Ave. In 1797 he founded the first Methodist Class in the Northwest Territory. The Village of More Info

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  • Promont

    Promont is a Victorian mansion circa 1865 and the former home of John M. Pattison, Ohio’s 43rd Governor. It is currently owned and operated as a museum by the Greater Milford Area Historical Society. The museum features period furnishings, a reference library, changing exhibits, and a gift shop. Docent-led or self-guided tours are available on More Info

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  • Research/Library

    The Leonard L. Harding, Jr. Library serves as a limited access historical library featuring information on Clermont County and the Greater Milford area.

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  • Teas/Weddings/Events

    PROMONT Teas and Boutique Event Venue Located in beautiful historic Milford, Promont was built circa 1865 as a lovely example of Victorian Italianate architecture in its entire splendor.  The mansion is steeped in old world elegance, period furnishings and modern amenities to help create the perfect backdrop for your Victorian tea luncheon, wedding, reception, corporate meeting More Info

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  • Gift Shop

    Shop and browse our unique Victorian Gift Shop, stocked with treasures for all ages and budgets

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The GMAHS History Readers Book club meets the first Tuesday of each month, 6:30 PM, at Promont. The lineup of books for upcoming months includes:

 

July 3, 2018

The Plot Against America  By Phillip Roth

The July 2018 Book Club Selection is The Plot Against America by Phillip Roth

Never more relevant than now, this national bestseller will challenge all who believe that “it can’t happen here.”

In an extraordinary feat of narrative invention, Philip Roth imagines an alternate history where Franklin D. Roosevelt loses the 1940 presidential election to heroic aviator and rabid isolationist Charles A. Lindbergh. Shortly thereafter, Lindbergh negotiates a cordial “understanding” with Adolf Hitler, while the new government embarks on a program of folksy anti-Semitism. 
 
For one boy growing up in Newark, Lindbergh’s election is the first in a series of ruptures that threaten to destroy his small, safe corner of America–and with it, his mother, his father, and his older brother.

 

August 7, 2018

The Great Gatsby  By F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s third book, stands as the supreme achievement of his career. First published in 1925, this quintessential novel of the Jazz Age has been acclaimed by generations of readers. The story of the mysteriously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when The New York Times noted “gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession,” it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s.

 

September 4, 2018

Killers of the Flower Moon  By David Grann

Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER   –  NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST 

In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, the Osage rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe.
            Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. One of her relatives was shot. Another was poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more Osage were dying under mysterious circumstances, and many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. 
            As the death toll rose, the newly created FBI took up the case, and the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to try to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including a Native American agent who infiltrated the region, and together with the Osage began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history.

October 2, 2018

All Quiet on the Western Front  By Erich Remarque

All Quiet on the Western Front

Paul Baumer enlisted in the German army with his classmates for World War I. Youthful and enthusiastic, they become soldiers. Yet despite all they have learned, they break into pieces under the first bombardment in the trenches. And as horrible war plods on year after year, Paul holds fast to a single vow: to fight against the principles of hate that meaninglessly pit young men of the same generation, but different uniforms, against each other–if only he can come out of the war alive.

November 6, 2018

The Other Einstein  By Marie Benedict

The Other Einstein: A Novel

In the tradition of The Paris Wife and Mrs. Poe, The Other Einstein offers us a window into a brilliant, fascinating woman whose light was lost in Einstein’s enormous shadow. It is the story of Einstein’s wife, a brilliant physicist in her own right, whose contribution to the special theory of relativity is hotly debated and may have been inspired by her own profound and very personal insight.

Mitza Maric has always been a little different from other girls. Most twenty-year-olds are wives by now, not studying physics at an elite Zurich university with only male students trying to outdo her clever calculations. But Mitza is smart enough to know that, for her, math is an easier path than marriage. And then fellow student Albert Einstein takes an interest in her, and the world turns sideways. Theirs becomes a partnership of the mind and of the heart, but there might not be room for more than one genius in a marriage.

December 4, 2018

Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis  By J.D. Vance

Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis

Hillbilly Elegy is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis—that of white working-class Americans. The disintegration of this group, a process that has been slowly occurring now for more than forty years, has been reported with growing frequency and alarm but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside as it is here. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck.

A deeply moving memoir, with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, Hillbilly Elegy is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.